District of Columbia’s New Human Rights Enhancement Amendment Act Changes Definitions of ‘Harassment’ and ‘Employee’

The District of Columbia recently amended the D.C. Human Rights Act (DCHRA) by adding a new protective status, broadening who is covered under the act. The District also modified the DCRHA to redefine how plaintiffs may prove harassment claims within the District. The new law, which took effect on October 1, 2022, is entitled the Human Rights Enhancement Amendment Act of 2022 (DCHREAA).

Louisiana Appellate Court Finds Nondiscretionary Production Bonus Based on Employee Work Is a “Wage” Payable at Termination

The Louisiana Court of Appeal, First Circuit, in DiVittorio v. Seale & Ross, PLC, affirmed a trial court’s judgment in favor of associate attorneys, granting them certain bonus compensation but denying another bonus claim. The appellate court held that the trial court had correctly ruled that the former associate attorneys earned their production bonuses, which were improperly withheld in bad faith.

Michigan Court of Appeals Maintains Status Quo Regarding Paid Medical Leave

On January 26, 2023, in the long-awaited opinion in Mothering Justice v. Attorney General, a three-judge panel of the Michigan Court of Appeals ruled, in a 3–0 opinion, that the Michigan Paid Medical Leave Act (PMLA) and Michigan Improved Workforce Opportunity Wage Act, as implemented in March 2019, will remain in place.

New York Judge Blocks COVID-19 Vaccination Mandate for Healthcare Facilities

On January 17, 2023, a New York trial court judge struck down the state’s vaccine mandate for healthcare workers, ruling that the New York State Department of Health (DOH) acted outside its authority and noting that “the COVID-19 shots do not prevent transmission.”

New York State Publishes Proposed Updated Model Sexual Harassment Prevention Policy

In accordance with its quadrennial obligation to evaluate the impact of New York State’s Model Sexual Harassment Prevention Policy in the workplace, on January 12, 2023, the New York State Department of Labor (NYSDOL), in consultation with the New York State Division of Human Rights, published a proposed updated model sexual harassment prevention policy.

San Francisco Passes Ordinance Requiring Private Employers to Provide Paid Military Leave

On January 20, 2023, San Francisco Mayor London Breed approved a city ordinance that will require large, private employers to provide differential paid leave for military reservists called up to active duty. The “Military Leave Pay Protection Act” adds Article 33Q to the city Police Code, and will make San Francisco the first major city in the United States to require that private employers provide differential paid leave to employees who are members of the military while they perform military service, the sponsor of the ordinance said when introducing it last year.

Albany County, New York’s New Law Requiring Disclosure of Pay Ranges in Job Postings

Employers in Albany County, New York, will soon be required to disclose expected pay ranges in job postings under a new pay transparency law. The law, which is expected to go into effect on March 9, 2023, adds Albany County to the growing list of jurisdictions across New York State with similar pay transparency requirements.

Connecticut Proposes Legislation to Increase Salary Transparency in Job Postings

Connecticut recently proposed legislation (Proposed H.B. No. 5243) that would “require employers to disclose salary ranges in all job postings.” In 2021, Connecticut was one of the first states to enact a pay transparency law requiring employers to disclose to applicants and employees the salary ranges for their positions. The proposed legislation would expand the existing law.

New York City’s New Job Protection Bill: Will It End At-Will Employment?

New York City is considering a bill known as the “Secure Jobs Act,” which would prohibit employers from discharging employees without “just cause” and advanced notice in most cases. Introduced on December 7, 2022, Int 0837-2022 would further restrict employers’ use of electronic monitoring and biometric data in making discharge and disciplinary decisions, and provide other protections for workers.

Colorado’s New Pay Standards Reflect the State’s Rising Cost of Living

The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment (CDLE) recently released the 2023 Publication and Yearly Calculation of Adjusted Labor Compensation Order (2023 PAY CALC Order). The 2023 PAY CALC Order has increased the compensation thresholds applicable to a variety of Colorado wage-and-hour and workplace requirements.

New Year, New State Minimum Compensation Thresholds for Restrictive Covenants

For many employers, a new year is a new opportunity to update policies, procedures, and agreements—including restrictive covenants. In addition to ensuring compliance with applicable state requirements as to timing, consideration, and restrictions, companies need to be aware of applicable compensation minimums for employees being asked to sign noncompetition and nonsolicitation agreements. With the start of the new year, many states have increased minimum compensation floors for such employees.

California Labor Agency Posts FAQs Relating to New Pay Scale Posting Requirements

Employers posting jobs to be filled in California must now include a pay range in the posting under new requirements that took effect at the beginning of 2023. Senate Bill (SB) 1162, which was signed by Governor Gavin Newsom in September 2022, seeks to address racial and gender pay disparities by requiring employers to post pay ranges in job postings and expanding employers’ pay data reporting obligations with the California Civil Rights Department (CRD). In December 2022, the California Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) released updated guidance for employers regarding the compliance with the new pay transparency obligations.

Cal/OSHA’s COVID-19 ETS Will Remain in Effect Pending OAL Approval of COVID-19 Prevention Non-Emergency Regulations

New COVID-19 prevention regulations adopted by the California Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board on December 15, 2022, were sent to the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) for approval. The new regulations will not take effect until approved by OAL, which has thirty working days to complete its review.

New York State’s Requirement to Provide Workplace Notices and Posters Electronically: What Employers Need to Know

In an acknowledgement of the increase in remote work, on December 16, 2022, New York State Governor Kathy Hochul signed into law Senate Bill S6805, which amends section 201 of the New York Labor Law to require New York State employers to make available electronically notices and posters that are required by law to be physically posted in the workplace.

California’s New Pay Transparency Law: Pay Data Reporting Obligation Changes for 2023

California recently enacted a landmark pay transparency law that requires employers to disclose pay ranges in job postings, joining a growing number of states and municipalities that impose such requirements aimed at improving pay equity. But beyond the pay scale requirements, Senate Bill (SB) 1162, signed in September 2022 by Governor Gavin Newsom, further broke new ground in expanding pay data reporting processes and requirements for California employers, and thus increasing employers’ compliance burden.

New York City Updates Proposed Rules for Automated Employment Decision Tools: What’s New and What’s Next

On December 23, 2022, the New York City Department of Consumer and Worker Protection (DCWP) published updated proposed rules to implement the city’s automated employment decision tools (AEDT) law (Local Law 144). The law conditions the use of automated employment decision tools to screen candidates for employment or employees for promotion within the city on compliance with certain requirements, including the performance of a bias audit, and the furnishing of notifications to candidates and employees.

Remote Work Arrangements Pose Travel-Related Reimbursement Challenges for Massachusetts Employers

For many employers in Massachusetts, remote work has become part of the new normal, with nearly a quarter of employees in the state having worked remotely in 2021, according to one recent media report. While such arrangements can be convenient and even allow for cost savings, they present novel challenges for employers, including whether and how to reimburse employees (including nonexempt and exempt employees) for various travel-related expenses.

California Judge Temporarily Enjoins Implementation of FAST Recovery Act

On December 30, 2022, a Sacramento County Superior Court judge issued a temporary restraining order blocking the State of California—in particular, the California Department of Industrial Relations—from implementing the provisions of Assembly Bill (AB) No. 257, the Fast Food Accountability and Standards Recovery Act (FAST Recovery Act).

Louisiana Restrictive Covenant Signed by C-Suite Employee After Termination Is Unenforceable, State Appeals Court Holds

In Louisiana, restrictive covenants—known locally as “no competes”—are unenforceable by statutory default. One exception, based on the employer-employee relationship, authorizes an employer to enforce an agreement preventing a former employee from working for a competing business or soliciting customers after the employee leaves employment with the first employer.

Ogletree Deakins’ New OSHA Tracker: Data Related to California, Texas, and Florida

Ogletree Deakins’ recently released OSHA Tracker tool allows employers to search and filter Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) data to identify emerging issues and OSHA enforcement trends. This interactive tool compiles comprehensive OSHA inspection, citation, and penalty data and allows employers to create custom searches and filter by OSHA region, state, industry, or date.

South Carolina Human Affairs Commission Releases Prohibition Against Employment Discrimination Poster

On November 14, 2022, the South Carolina Human Affairs Commission revised its employment anti-discrimination poster. The poster serves to inform employees and applicants of the protected classes of individuals covered by the South Carolina Human Affairs Law regarding the types of employment actions prohibited by the law, how to report discrimination, and the commission’s role in enforcement.