What Does S.B. 215, Ohio’s New Firearms Law, Mean for Employers?

Currently, in the state of Ohio, in order to obtain a concealed handgun license, which is valid for five years, an Ohio resident must submit an application to the county sheriff, pay an initial $67 fee, pass a background check, and meet the minimum educational requirements, which include completing eight hours of training (at least two of which must be in-person training) and passing a written test.

U.S. Department of Education Announces Plans to Conduct Comprehensive Review of Title IX Regulations

On April 6, 2021, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) announced plans to begin a comprehensive review of its regulations implementing Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, in response to President Joe Biden’s executive order of March 8, 2021, “Executive Order on Guaranteeing an Educational Environment Free From Discrimination on the Basis of Sex, Including Sexual Orientation or Gender Identity” (Executive Order 14021).

Ohio Issues Consolidated Order for Social Distancing, Facial Coverings, and Limits on Gatherings

On April 5, 2021, Director of Ohio’s Department of Health (ODH), Stephanie McCloud, issued two new orders, including a consolidated Director’s Order for Social Distancing, Facial Coverings and Non-Congregating and a Director’s Order Rescinding Various Orders. The orders went into effect on April 5, 2021, and the Order for Social Distancing, Facial Coverings and Non-Congregating will remain in force until the ODH modifies or rescinds it.

Title IX Regulations: Biden Administration Signals Changes Ahead

On March 8, 2021, President Joe Biden signed the “Executive Order on Guaranteeing an Educational Environment Free from Discrimination on the Basis of Sex, Including Sexual Orientation or Gender Identity,” making clear his administration’s intention to implement changes to the regulations issued on May 6, 2020 (effective August 14, 2020), by the U.S. Department of Education, regarding the handling of sexual misconduct allegations under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

China’s New Civil Code Cracks Down on Sexual Harassment and Protects Individual Privacy Rights

Amidst the pandemic, China introduced a civil code—its first-ever compilation of civil laws detailing the rights of private parties. The code’s attention to sexual harassment provides another important reminder that even as workplaces focus on virtual workforces, social distancing, and other novel legal issues, workplace respect and inclusion remain essential to a well-functioning workplace.

What Colleges and Universities Need to Know About the Department of Education’s Final Title IX Rules

On May 6, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education released final regulations governing how institutions that receive federal financial assistance covered by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX) must respond to allegations of sexual harassment. Notably, in the decades during which the department has been responsible for overseeing Title IX compliance, this is the first time it has issued regulations addressing sexual harassment as a form of prohibited sex discrimination under Title IX.

CDC Issues Guidance for Universities and Colleges on Safely Opening Campuses

On May 21, 2020, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued Considerations for Institutes of Higher Education, outlining recommendations and guidance on ways universities and colleges can safely open while helping to protect their students, faculty, staff, administrators, and community members. The CDC cautions that “[t]he more an individual interacts with others, and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread.”

Toledo City Council Passes Ordinance Prohibiting Salary History Inquiries

On June 26, 2019, the Toledo City Council approved Ordinance 173-19, titled “Pay Equity Act to Prohibit the Inquiry and Use of Salary History in Hiring Practices in the City of Toledo.” The law prohibits employers from inquiring about or using an applicant’s salary history to screen job applicants, in deciding whether to offer employment, or in determining salary, benefits, or other compensation during the hiring process. The Toledo pay equity act also bans employers from refusing to hire or otherwise retaliating against a job applicant for failing to disclose his or her salary history.

Will Ohio Become the 17th State to Allow Residents to Carry Concealed Guns Without a License?

Ohio may become the 17th state to allow individuals to carry concealed guns without a permit. Currently, in the state of Ohio, in order to obtain a concealed handgun license, which is valid for 5 years, an Ohio resident must submit an application to the county sheriff, pay an initial $67 fee (or $91 if the applicant has been an Ohio resident for less than 5 years), pass a federal background check, and complete the minimum educational requirements, including a total of 8 hours of training (at least 2 of which must be in-person training).