Working for the Weekend: Denial of Pay Premium Due to FMLA-Related Absences Does Not Violate the FMLA

On January 8, 2019, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Arkansas issued an opinion and order granting summary judgment to an employer, finding the employer did not violate the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) by discontinuing an employee’s shift differential due to absences necessitated by FMLA leave.

Second Circuit Lowers Bar for Causation in FMLA Retaliation Claims

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit recently ruled that to advance a viable claim for retaliation under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), an employee need only demonstrate that exercising his or her rights under the FMLA, such as taking protected leave, was viewed as a negative factor by the employer in connection with an adverse employment action. This so-called “motivating factor” or “mixed-motive” standard is a lower burden of proof than the “but for” standard often applied to retaliation claims.

It’s Time to Update Physician Noncompete Agreements in Connecticut

There have been a number of recent legislative developments that will impact physician noncompete agreements entered into in Connecticut. First, any physician noncompete agreement entered into on or after July 1, 2016, must comply with Public Act No. 16-95 (the Act), which was signed into law by Governor Dannel P. Malloy on June 2, 2016. In short, the Act prohibits noncompete agreements that restrict physicians from competing for a period longer than 1 year or provide for a geographical restriction of more than 15 miles from the primary site where the physician practices. In addition, the Act provides that noncompete agreements will be enforceable only when a physician resigns or is discharged for cause.

Second Circuit Holds HR Professionals Can Be Liable as ‘Employers’ Under FMLA

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals has recently held that a human resources manager could be held liable as an employer under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). In issuing its decision in Graziadio v. Culinary Institute of America, the court also articulated standards for FMLA interference claims and association discrimination claims under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

New Law Restricts Employer Access to Employee Social Media Accounts, Including Through “Friend Requests”

On March 23, 2015, Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe signed a new law, H.B. 2081, that restricts the ability of employers in Virginia to access the social media accounts of current and prospective employees—making Virginia the nineteenth state to enact such legislation. The other 18 states include Arkansas, California, Colorado, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin.

Employee Not Entitled to Compensation for Time Spent Commuting to and from Job Sites and Home in Company Vehicle While Carrying Company Tools

In a recent decision, the Connecticut Supreme Court found that a plumbing foreman was not entitled to compensation for the time he spent commuting to and from job sites and his home at the beginning and end of his workday, even though he used a company vehicle and carried his employer’s tools to and from

In Connecticut, Global Release “Non-Binding” with Respect to Workers’ Compensation Claims Until Approved by Commissioner

In a recent decision, the Connecticut Supreme Court gave teeth to the provisions of Connecticut General Statute § 31-296 of the Connecticut Workers’ Compensation Act—which provide a mechanism through which employers and employees can work together to reach a private agreement regarding the compensation owed to an employee who suffers a workplace injury. In so

Commercial Driver Fired for Driving Under the Influence Eligible for Unemployment Benefits According to Connecticut Supreme Court

Tuxis Ohr’s Fuel Inc. v. Administrator, Unemployment Compensation Act, No. 18791 (July 30, 2013): The Connecticut Supreme Court recently addressed whether an employee who lost his commercial driver’s license for driving under the influence of alcohol while off duty and, as a result, was discharged from a job for which that license was required, was

Connecticut Public Policy Supports, and in Some Cases, Requires, Termination of Workplace Harassers

State of Connecticut v. AFSCME, Council 4, Local 391, No. 18749 (August 6, 2013): The Connecticut Supreme Court recently upheld the reversal of an arbitrator’s decision to reinstate an employee whose employment was terminated for sexually harassing a coworker. The court determined that the arbitrator’s ruling for reinstatement was a violation of “clear, well-defined, and

New Connecticut Supreme Court Decision Clarifies Application of the Connecticut Family and Medical Leave Act

On September 25, 2012, the Connecticut Supreme Court held in Velez v. Comm’r of Labor, 306 Conn. 475 (Conn. 2012) that the Connecticut Family and Medical Leave Act (CFMLA) applies only to employers with 75 or more employees located within the state of Connecticut, irrespective of the total number of employees it employs elsewhere.