A GDPR Update for Employers, Part IV: Implementing Lessons Learned From GDPR Complaints and Enforcement Actions

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) and EU supervisory authorities have reported that they have received a large number of complaints during the first six months following the effective date of the GDPR. For example, the EDPB reported that it had received more than 42,000 complaints since May 25, 2018. The French Supervisory Authority (CNIL) reported a 20 percent increase in complaints filed during the first six months the GDPR was effective compared to the same period in 2017. Similarly, the Irish Supervisory Authority reported a 50 percent increase in data breach reports and a 65 percent increase in data protection complaints over the same period. The Irish Data Protection Commissioner also stated that several investigations of multijurisdictional complaints against large companies are being completed and that she expects major GDPR fines to be issued in 2019.

A GDPR Update for Employers, Part III: Preparing Required Data Protection Impact Assessments

Article 35 of the GDPR provides that a data protection impact assessment (DPIA) must be performed for data processing that “is likely to result in a high risk to the rights and freedoms of natural persons.” DPIAs must contain (1) a description of the processing operation along with the purpose of the processing and, where applicable, the legitimate interest for the processing; (2) an assessment of the necessity and proportionality of the processing operation in relation to the purpose; (3) an assessment of the risks to the rights and freedoms of the data subjects; and (4) the measures to be taken to mitigate the risks.

A GDPR Update for Employers, Part II: Aligning HR Practices to Comply with National Legislation Implementing the GDPR

Although the GDPR was intended to provide a uniform set of data protection requirements across the EU, the GDPR contains several provisions, known as “opening clauses,” that expressly permit individual EU countries to implement additional and/or stricter requirements for certain types of data that employers typically process.

A GDPR Update for Employers, Part I: Determining Whether Your Organization’s HR Data Processing Is Covered

Much has happened since the European Union (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) went into effect on May 25, 2018. Many EU countries have enacted national legislation to implement and expand the requirements of the GDPR, while other developments have directly affected employers and created new obligations regarding the collection and processing of human resources (HR) data.

Gender Pay Gap Reporting—Happy Anniversary?

April 4, 2019 will mark the first anniversary of mandatory private-sector gender pay gap reporting in the United Kingdom. One year in, and organizations appear to be in the same last-minute position they were in during the first reporting year, submitting their data just before the deadline. Regardless of timing, the key question is: has the last 12 months had any impact on the issue of addressing the gender pay gap generally?

The Roma Effect: IMSS Announces Test Program to Extend Benefits to Domestic Employees in Mexico

There are about 2.4 million domestic employees in Mexico, 95 percent of whom are women and do not have social security benefits. The Mexican Supreme Court of Justice recently held that it is not legal to exclude domestic employees from the country’s social security system, which is administered by the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS).

Many Large Employers in France to Pay “Exceptional Purchasing Power Bonus”

In response to the yellow vests movement (mouvement des gilets jaunes), which calls for measures to increase purchasing power of France’s working class, a law adopted on December 24, 2018, which was then clarified in two government circulars (Circ. DSS/5B/2019/29, dated February 6, 2019) recently introduced an “exceptional purchasing power bonus.”

What Manufacturers Need to Know About Labor and Employment Law in Canada

Manufacturers in Canada face a labor and employment environment that is much more employee and union-friendly than the United States. That said, a sophisticated manufacturing employer that is educated, strategic, and proactive about managing its plant can find itself with a competitive business advantage. Here are just a few of the “Need to Knows” for manufacturers that are presently doing business or thinking about doing business in the Great White North.

Mexican National Commission on Minimum Wages Approves an Increase to the 2019 Daily General Minimum Wage and Further Establishes Two Different Geographic Areas for Its Application

In December 2018, the Mexican National Commission on Minimum Wages (Comisión Nacional de los Salarios Mínimos, or CONASAMI) issued a resolution to increase the daily general minimum wage (DGMW) beginning on January 1, 2019.

German Federal Labor Court Rules Limitation Periods in Employment Contracts That Do Not Explicitly Exclude the Minimum Wage Are Ineffective

The questions of whether limitation periods in employment contracts must expressly exclude claims to the statutory minimum wage and whether limitation/forfeiture clauses in employment contracts without such an exception are ineffective in their entirety or only partially with regard to minimum wage claims are especially important in practice.

5 Common Issues Multinational Employers May Encounter When Implementing Leave Policies

For the purposes of talent acquisition and retention, multinational employers with U.S. parental leave policies may wish to roll out the exact same policies at all locations. However, this can easily turn into a tale of “no good deed goes unpunished” because certain provisions may run afoul of local laws and customs or inadvertently grant additional benefits.

Navigating Canada’s New Cannabis Law—Don’t Let an Employee’s Immigration Status Go Up in Smoke

On October 17, 2018, Canada’s federal Cannabis Act went into effect, legalizing the use and possession of a limited amount of marijuana for adults over the age of 18. The new law makes good on a campaign promise by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and makes Canada the second country to legalize marijuana use on a national basis. It is intended to make Canada’s marijuana industry safer by keeping the drug out of the hands of kids and steering profits away from criminals. This newfound freedom (and tax revenue), however, may come at a cost to those trying to cross the border into the United States, where marijuana is still illegal under federal law.