Japan’s COVID-19 Response Could Indicate a Global Shift in Daily Workplace Disease Prevention Practices

Recognizing that Japan has entered a new phase in its fight against the spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), Japan officials announced a preemptive approach geared toward risk mitigation and slowing down the spread of the virus to prevent a spike in infections. This strategy, which includes strengthening testing and quarantining capacities, could have long-term impacts on employment practices, particularly in office-based environments in which technology provides more adaptive flexibility.

20 Tips for U.S. Virgin Islands Employers in 2020: Workers’ Compensation Insurance Update

Conducting business in the Virgin Islands poses unique challenges not often encountered in the states, but also unique opportunities. This 20-part blog series will offer tips for doing business in the U.S. Virgin Islands, covering a broad array of topics affecting employers. Part one of this series addresses workers’ compensation insurance.

China Provides Return-to-Work Guidance for Employers Dealing With End of Spring Festival Holidays and Ongoing Coronavirus Epidemic

The outbreak of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (now designated COVID-19) caused massive disruption in China, including a nationwide extension of its Spring Festival holidays. Though February 10, 2020, was the last “public holiday,” some businesses remain closed, and many still encourage China-based employees to work from home.

Brexit Is Here! What Employers Need to Know About the UK’s Departure From the EU

On January 31, 2020, the United Kingdom formally left the European Union after 47 years of membership. However, for a transitional period that will end on December 31, 2020, it will still be covered by all current agreements including membership in the European Single Market and European Union Customs Union and rights such as freedom of movement of workers throughout the EU.

The Coronavirus Outbreak’s Impact on International Employers

As the world responds to the accelerating 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak originating in Wuhan, China—a situation now declared by the World Health Organization to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern—multinational employers, particularly those with employees based in or traveling to China, are assessing their role in managing workforce impact. In addition to taking precautions to prevent the spread of illness, employers are contending with government-imposed travel shutdowns and advisories, quarantines, border screenings, and extended holidays that may affect local operations and global mobility.

Termination Clauses in Ontario—Precise Language Can Help Limit Employers’ Liability

In Canada, if an employer wishes to terminate an employee without cause, it must provide notice or pay in lieu thereof. In other words, unlike in the United States, Canada does not have employment at-will. American businesses operating in Canada may find that Canadian employees whose employment has been terminated without cause will be entitled to no less than one month per year of service if a judge is left to decide an employee’s severance package. For this reason, employment contracts—and, specifically, the termination clauses in those contracts—are essential to controlling severance costs in Canada.

USMCA Review: A New Deal for Labour in the ‘New NAFTA’

The United States–Mexico–Canada Agreement (USMCA) is a free-trade pact that was agreed to by U.S. President Donald Trump, then-president of Mexico Enrique Peña Nieto, and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on November 30, 2018. This agreement changes the current rules governing North American trade contained in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

EU-U.S. Privacy Shield: EU Commission Confirms Adequacy but Highlights Room for Improvement

On October 23, 2019, the European Commission published its report after its third annual review on the functioning of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield. The Privacy Shield, which became operational in August 2016, details procedures and safeguards for transatlantic data transfers from the European Union (EU) to the United States.

Canada Implements Significant Reforms to Basic Federal Employment Standards

Canadian employers subject to federal regulation will want to take note of changes to the Canada Labour Code that came into force on September 1, 2019. These reforms apply to a large number of minimum employment standards with vacation, breaks, leaves of absences, and predictive scheduling impacted, among others. As a result of the far-reaching nature of the changes, they will have a significant impact on federally regulated workplaces.

Mexico’s New Requirements to Validate Existing Collective Bargaining Agreements: What Employers Need to Know

On July 31, 2019, Mexico’s Ministry of Labor and Social Welfare or Secretaría del Trabajo y Previsión Social (STPS) published in the Official Gazette of the Federation (Diario Oficial de la Federación) (DOF) the protocol to legitimize currently existing collective bargaining agreements (CBAs).

France’s Professional Future Law Reduces Secondment Obligations and Increases Penalties for Secondment Fraud

French law No. 2018-771 of September 5, 2018, which is a law “for the freedom to choose one’s professional future,” modified various subjects of interest to companies, including secondment and illegal work. Enforceable since September 7, 2018, unless specified otherwise, this legislation only applies to companies seconding employees in France. This Act reduces the employer’s obligations in order to make secondment easier and strengthens protections for secondees by increasing administrative penalties for noncompliance with such obligations.

A GDPR Update for Employers, Part IV: Implementing Lessons Learned From GDPR Complaints and Enforcement Actions

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) and EU supervisory authorities have reported that they have received a large number of complaints during the first six months following the effective date of the GDPR. For example, the EDPB reported that it had received more than 42,000 complaints since May 25, 2018. The French Supervisory Authority (CNIL) reported a 20 percent increase in complaints filed during the first six months the GDPR was effective compared to the same period in 2017. Similarly, the Irish Supervisory Authority reported a 50 percent increase in data breach reports and a 65 percent increase in data protection complaints over the same period. The Irish Data Protection Commissioner also stated that several investigations of multijurisdictional complaints against large companies are being completed and that she expects major GDPR fines to be issued in 2019.

A GDPR Update for Employers, Part III: Preparing Required Data Protection Impact Assessments

Article 35 of the GDPR provides that a data protection impact assessment (DPIA) must be performed for data processing that “is likely to result in a high risk to the rights and freedoms of natural persons.” DPIAs must contain (1) a description of the processing operation along with the purpose of the processing and, where applicable, the legitimate interest for the processing; (2) an assessment of the necessity and proportionality of the processing operation in relation to the purpose; (3) an assessment of the risks to the rights and freedoms of the data subjects; and (4) the measures to be taken to mitigate the risks.

A GDPR Update for Employers, Part II: Aligning HR Practices to Comply with National Legislation Implementing the GDPR

Although the GDPR was intended to provide a uniform set of data protection requirements across the EU, the GDPR contains several provisions, known as “opening clauses,” that expressly permit individual EU countries to implement additional and/or stricter requirements for certain types of data that employers typically process.

A GDPR Update for Employers, Part I: Determining Whether Your Organization’s HR Data Processing Is Covered

Much has happened since the European Union (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) went into effect on May 25, 2018. Many EU countries have enacted national legislation to implement and expand the requirements of the GDPR, while other developments have directly affected employers and created new obligations regarding the collection and processing of human resources (HR) data.

Gender Pay Gap Reporting—Happy Anniversary?

April 4, 2019 will mark the first anniversary of mandatory private-sector gender pay gap reporting in the United Kingdom. One year in, and organizations appear to be in the same last-minute position they were in during the first reporting year, submitting their data just before the deadline. Regardless of timing, the key question is: has the last 12 months had any impact on the issue of addressing the gender pay gap generally?