Ogletree Deakins International Video Series: Top 5 Labor and Employment Concerns for U.S.-Based Multinational Businesses

In the first installment of our four-part video series, two of our International Practice Group shareholders, Carson Burnham, chair of the practice group, and Diana Nehro, a shareholder in our Boston and Stamford offices, discuss the top five labor and employment concerns for U.S.-based in-house counsel with operations abroad.

So You’re Going Global! Five Employment Basics for U.S. Companies Expanding Overseas

Your company is doing well in the United States, and you are looking to expand internationally. That can be a very exciting time! But besides the practical logistics (e.g., Do I need to set up a subsidiary to hire someone overseas?), what fundamentals do you need to know before you take on an employee in another country? Once you grasp the basic differences between dealing with U.S.- and non-U.S. employees, you will foster smoother employee-employer relationships and prevent unexpected hits to your bottom line. Following are five points to consider as you hire and manage employees in other countries.

U.S. and International Employers: Now Is the Time to Reaffirm Your Commitment to Diversity and Inclusion

No doubt walking a difficult line in the wake of the election results, human resources professionals are tasked with cementing their companies’ position as equal opportunity employers. At the same time, some female employees, employees with diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, employees from different countries, and non-U.S. citizens working for U.S.-headquartered companies are feeling intimidated by news reports of hostility in the workplace. Some employees feel silenced and are afraid to take advantage of internal complaint procedures, decreasing the prospect for internal resolution.

Independent Contractor or Employee: Tips for Drafting Multinational Independent-Contractor Agreements

In our last two posts, we identified international legal implications of an independent-contractor relationship (Part One) and issues to consider before choosing an independent-contractor engagement (Part Two). In this, our third blog post in the Employee or Independent Contractor series, we will discuss key points for drafting an effective independent-contractor…..

Independent Contractor or Employee: Issues to Consider Before Choosing an Independent-Contractor Engagement

In the last installment of the “Independent Contractor or Employee” series, we discussed what laws might apply and what problems you might encounter when using an independent-contractor engagement for your multinational organization. In this installment we pose questions to consider when determining whether an independent-contractor engagement is the best solution…..

Independent Contractor or Employee: Are Independent Contractors the Best Solution for Multinational Organizations?

Almost every organization expanding overseas needs a vehicle to explore the market before making the business decision to establish a legal entity, yet few legal vehicles are available for this preliminary measure. Most often, multinational organizations meet this need by entering into independent-contractor arrangements with individuals. While a useful vehicle…..

The DOJ and SEC Issue Their Comprehensive Guide to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act

General Counsels, Chief Executive Officers, Chief Financial Officers, and Corporate Secretaries of U.S. publicly-traded companies across the country must take individual responsibility for the accuracy and completeness of corporate financial reports filed quarterly and annually. Under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and Exchange Act Rules, this certification includes confirmation that the company has appropriate internal disclosure controls, which also directly or indirectly constitutes a certification of worldwide compliance with the corporate compliance obligations.

Following U.S. Withdrawal from Iraq, Government Contractors Facing Tough Challenges from New Immigration Requirements

The United States’ presence in transitional Iraq resulted in many opportunities for U.S. government contractors. Since the early 2000s, a significant number of U.S. government contractors have engaged individuals to perform work in Iraq, and sponsored visas for those individuals. In recent years, the legality of these arrangements largely was governed by an agreement between