California Pay Equity Data Collection Legislation Closer to Passing

Currently, certain employers are required under federal law to file annual Employer Information Reports (EEO-1) with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. These EEO-1s must contain data regarding demographics of the employer’s workforce. Accordingly, employers covered by federal EEO-1 reporting requirements were required to file EEO-1 Component 1 data from 2018 by May 31, 2019, and must still submit Component 2 EEO-1 (pay and hours worked) data for their workforces by September 30, 2019. Not to be outdone, the State of California is poised to impose a similar requirement on employers.

California’s Paid Family Leave Program to Expand from 6 to 8 Weeks

California is expanding state benefits available to workers who lose wages while taking time off to care for a seriously ill family member or to bond with a new child. On June 27, 2019, Governor Gavin Newsom signed California’s 2019-20 state budget, which included an expansion of the state’s family temporary disability insurance program administered through the Employment Development Department (EDD). The benefit program is commonly referred to as “paid family leave” or PFL.

California Court Delivers Trucking Company a Meal/Rest Break Win and Limits the Application of the ABC Test

The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California recently ruled in an employment class action regarding misclassification of trucking industry owner-operators as independent contractors. The ruling is a win for numerous industries.

Supreme Court Rules Title VII’s Requirement to File a Charge With the EEOC Is Not Jurisdictional

On June 3, 2019, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the precondition in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 requiring employees to file a charge with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) before commencing an action in court is not jurisdictional. Rather, the charge-filing requirement is a “nonjurisdictional claim-processing rule,” Justice Ginsburg wrote in a unanimous opinion. “[A] rule may be mandatory without being jurisdictional, and Title VII’s charge-filing requirement fits that bill,” the Court ruled.

EEOC Posts Notice That EEO-1 Pay Data Collection Is Back

On April 29, 2019, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) published a notice that the EEO-1 pay data collection is being reinstated immediately. According to the EEOC’s website, employers covered by EEO-1 reporting requirements must submit 2018 Component 2 EEO-1 (pay and hours worked) data for their workforces by September 30, 2019.

1 More Hour of Sleep but 4 More Wage and Hour Problems as Daylight Saving Time Ends

On Sunday, November 4, 2018, at 2:00 a.m., daylight saving time will end. This World War I–era practice of turning back the clock one hour in the fall became a federal law in the United States when President Lyndon Johnson signed the Uniform Time Act in 1966. The jury is still out on whether “falling back” is beneficial. Claims that it helps to conserve energy are dubious. Most people probably don’t get an extra hour of sleep that night. And, the time change doesn’t actually increase the number of hours of sunlight per day. However, it does present a good opportunity for employers to examine their timekeeping practices with regard to nonexempt employees.

WHD Conducts Final Listening Session on Part 541 Regulations, Announces March 2019 Target Date for NPRM

On August 27, 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced that it would be conducting a series of listening sessions in various cities across the United States to solicit feedback on the overtime rule. The DOL, which plans to update the Fair Labor Standards Act’s Part 541 white collar exemption regulations, held sessions open to the public in Atlanta, GA; Seattle, WA; Kansas City, MO; Denver, CO; and Providence, RI throughout September. On Wednesday, October 17, 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Wage and Hour Division (WHD) conducted its last public listening session to solicit views and opinions on the Part 541 overtime or white-collar regulations.

Hurricane Preparedness and Response for the Restaurant Industry

As residents and employers on the East Coast are aware, Hurricane Florence is expected to make landfall shortly. This type of disaster can take a toll on businesses in the affected areas, from property damage to employee safety complications. Employers in the restaurant industry face a unique set of potential issues before, during, and after a disaster like a hurricane.

Is Your Company Ready for Hurricane Florence? A One-Stop Resource for Employers Dealing With Disasters

The National Hurricane Center has stated that Hurricane Florence, which is classified as a Category 4 storm, may hit the East Coast as early as Thursday, September 13. As a result, residents of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and the surrounding areas are preparing for 130 mph winds, floods, and heavy rains (and in some cases, evacuating the affected areas).  Businesses with operations or employees in those areas could also be affected by power interruptions, disrupted communications, and transportation difficulties—in addition to concerns over their employees’ safety.

OFCCP on a Roll: Issues 3 More Directives Aimed at Compensation Practices, AAPs, and Contractor Recognition

Just two weeks after the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) released two directives under Acting Director Craig Leen, the agency released three more initiatives. On August 24, 2018, OFCCP announced three directives being rolled out as “part of the Department’s efforts to maximize the effectiveness of compliance assistance outreach.”

What I Did on My Summer Internship: A Primer for Employers on National Intern Day

July 26, 2018, is National Intern Day according to WayUp, the job site for college students and recent graduates. The organization’s campaign to acknowledge the role of interns in the workforce is intended to “encourage[] employers to celebrate, empower and recognize interns.” WayUp encourages employers to participate in the “holiday” by celebrating their interns (“anything from a mentorship session to a free pizza lunch or anything that feels right for your company”).

OFCCP Extends TRICARE Moratorium to 2021

According to a May 18, 2018, press release, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) has extended its moratorium on enforcing the affirmative action obligations of TRICARE providers (a health care program of the U.S. Department of Defense that pays for the medical benefits of active duty and retired military personnel and their families).