Indiana Governor Issues Updated Stay-at-Home Order Due to Continued Spread of COVID-19

On April 6, 2020, Indiana Governor Eric J. Holcomb issued an updated “Stay-at-Home Order,” Executive Order 20-18 (E.O. 20-18), superseding the Stay-at-Home Order that he issued on March 23, 2020. In announcing the updated order, Governor Holcomb noted that COVID-19 had spread to almost every county in Indiana.

Indiana Governor Holcomb Issues Stay-at-Home Order Due to COVID-19

On March 23, 2020, Indiana Governor Eric J. Holcomb issued a “Stay-at-Home Order,” Executive Order 20-08 (E.O. 20-08). Under the order, Indiana residents are directed to stay in their homes except to engage in certain “Essential Activities,” including taking care of others, obtaining necessary supplies, and for health and safety reasons. Individuals are also permitted to leave home to work for certain “Essential Business or Operations,” and to carry out certain permitted activities, including “Minimum Basic Operations.” Under the order, nonessential business operations may continue only to the extent that employees or contractors are performing activities exclusively at their own residences.

FAQs on the Spokane, Washington Paid Sick and Safe Leave Law

On January 25, 2016, the Spokane City Council overturned the Spokane mayor’s veto and passed Ordinance C-35300, which provides paid sick and safe leave to employees performing more than 240 hours of work in the city of Spokane in a calendar year. Spokane follows the cities of Seattle, Tacoma, and SeaTac in implementing paid leave ordinances in Washington. The ordinance requires employers to provide employees with one hour of paid sick and safe leave for every 30 hours worked starting on January 1, 2017.

Seattle Paid Sick and Safe Leave Ordinance—Employers with Employees Working in Seattle, Are You Ready for the New Seattle Ordinance?

Effective September 1, 2012, most private employers that have employees working within the city of Seattle, Washington will be required to provide such employees specific amounts of paid leave for use for personal illness, family care, absences related to closures due to public hazards, and absences relating to domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking. San Francisco, Washington, D.C., and the state of Connecticut also have similar laws on the books.