Common Reasons for Flagged Pay Differences

Some employers have a practice of periodically conducting statistical analyses of employee compensation, under attorney-client privilege, to identify potential areas of risk related to pay equity concerns. These analyses are usually focused on gender and race or national origin. Through these statistical analyses, employees are placed into comparator groups and the compensation of the employees in those groups is analyzed for differences that remain after controlling for relevant factors available in the data set. Such factors may include data points such as job title, tenure with the company, time in position, location/market, and performance ratings. Once the analysis has controlled for the available factors, the statistical model will flag those comparator groups where the pay differences are statistically significant and adverse to a particular demographic.

FAQs About the DOL’s Proposed Regular Rate Requirements

On March 28, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced a proposed rule that would update and clarify regular rate requirements. Specifically, the proposed rule lists perks and benefits, such as unused paid leave and reimbursed expenses that employers can exclude when calculating an employee’s regular rate of pay. This article provides concise answers to employers’ frequently asked questions about the proposed rule.

Pay Equity and Equal Pay Day: A Short Primer on Bans on Salary History Inquiries

Pay equity legislation is burgeoning: in 2017, several jurisdictions—including Albany, New York City, California, San Francisco, Massachusetts, Delaware, Philadelphia and Oregon —approved bans on salary history inquiries. The ostensible purpose of these laws is to prevent the continuation of pay disparities that may have affected female applicants in their work experiences prior to seeking employment with a new company.

Is the Pay Gap a Sickness in Your Healthcare Organization? How Healthcare Employers Can Tackle Gender Pay Disparities

In 2017, a number of cases were filed in federal court in various states by female doctors claiming their employers paid them less than allegedly comparable male doctors. At least one of these cases was conditionally certified as a collective action under the Equal Pay Act. These cases followed on the heels of recent studies showing that, on average, female doctors are paid less than male doctors.

Preventing Harassment Claims in the Restaurant Industry

With so many stories in the news of very high-level, high-profile men being accused of sexual harassment, many employers are rightfully concerned about whether they may be at risk of similar claims. While these stories have crossed various industries, restaurant employers may be at a higher risk than others for these types of claims. According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), 37 percent of all sexual harassment charges filed with the agency were filed by employees in the restaurant industry—and there is some evidence that such harassment claims are underreported.

Religious Accommodation in the Healthcare Industry: What to Do When an Employee’s Beliefs Clash With Job Duties

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employers from discriminating against applicants and employees based on their religion, and requires employers to provide a reasonable accommodation of employees’ sincerely held religious beliefs. State laws provide employees and applicants with similar protections of their religious beliefs.

Preparing for the Upcoming Amendments to the FLSA Overtime Regulations: A Toolkit for Retail and Hospitality Employers

As we have previously reported, the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) proposed amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), specifically as to the criteria for the Part 541 “white collar” exemptions, are projected to have an enormous impact on retail and hospitality employers. If these amendments are made final without revision, they will result in: (1) a dramatic increase to the minimum salary required for most of the employees who qualify for white collar exemptions; (2) a substantial increase in the minimum compensation required for an employee to qualify for the Highly Compensated Employee exemption; and (3) annual adjustments to these minimums tied to changes in the Consumer Price Index.

Uniforms, Dress Codes, and the FLSA

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) does not prohibit employers from requiring employees to follow a particular dress code or wear a designated uniform. However, it does prohibit employers from requiring employees to pay for uniforms, if such costs would cause an employee’s pay to drop below the minimum wage.

What’s Next For Retailers After Integrity Staffing?

It is well-established that employees are responsible for a vast amount of inventory theft—or shrink—that retail employers experience on a daily basis. Recognizing this fact, retail employers utilize various loss prevention policies, procedures, processes, and methods to combat internal theft and minimize its potential effect on the bottom line. One such…..

FAQs on Compliance With the Federal Tip Credit

Many employers in the hospitality industry employ individuals who receive customer tips or gratuities in the ordinary course of their work day. These tips may serve as an offset against an employer’s minimum wage obligations under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)—but only if certain criteria are met. What is…..