Effective Use of the Subcontractor’s Sworn Statement

The subcontractor’s sworn statement is one of most effective tools that contractors can use to ensure that lower-tier subcontractors and suppliers receive adequate payment throughout the job, yet many contractors either fail to appreciate how the sworn statement works or simply fail to utilize it, thereby increasing their risk of mechanics liens, bond claims, and double payments.

Hybrid Cost-Plus Contracting With Lump-Sum General Conditions Offers Advantages for Contractors and Owners

The most common method of contracting for private commercial construction is reimbursement of the contractor’s construction costs plus a fee, with a guaranteed maximum price. Cost-plus contracting offers the allure of “open-book” contracting and provides the opportunity to return all or part of the savings when the costs come in below the guaranteed maximum price.

Construction One-Minute Read: Litigation Challenges With Collecting Attorneys’ Fees

It is common knowledge among construction litigators that in order for a contractor to recover attorneys’ fees from a subcontractor, the subcontract must specifically state that attorneys’ fees are recoverable. However, in litigation, the arguments impeding a contractor’s recovery of fees are quite nuanced.

Has the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals Expanded the Grounds for Reviewing Arbitration Awards?

A fundamental tenet of arbitration is that arbitration awards are subject to very limited review and are rarely vacated due to an error in contract interpretation. The Illinois Uniform Arbitration Act sets forth just five limited grounds under which a court can vacate an arbitration award, including fraud; evident partiality; where the arbitrators exceeded their powers; where the arbitrators refused to permit material evidence; or where no arbitration agreement existed.