Canada Implements Significant Reforms to Basic Federal Employment Standards

Canadian employers subject to federal regulation will want to take note of changes to the Canada Labour Code that came into force on September 1, 2019. These reforms apply to a large number of minimum employment standards with vacation, breaks, leaves of absences, and predictive scheduling impacted, among others. As a result of the far-reaching nature of the changes, they will have a significant impact on federally regulated workplaces.

What Manufacturers Need to Know About Labor and Employment Law in Canada

Manufacturers in Canada face a labor and employment environment that is much more employee and union-friendly than the United States. That said, a sophisticated manufacturing employer that is educated, strategic, and proactive about managing its plant can find itself with a competitive business advantage. Here are just a few of the “Need to Knows” for manufacturers that are presently doing business or thinking about doing business in the Great White North.

Highlights of the Alberta Employment Standards Code Update

The province of Alberta, Canada, enacted significant revisions to its Employment Standards Code effective January 1, 2018, overhauling its foundational employment laws for the first time in almost 30 years. Canadian employment law is generally provincial—and each province has its own core employment legislation with its own regulations governing matters such as overtime pay, job-protected leaves of absence, annual vacation, and termination requirements.

The Impact of Bill 132: Understanding and Applying Ontario’s Recent Sexual Harassment and Violence Legislation

In recent years, a number of high-profile cases involving sexual violence and sexual harassment have grabbed the headlines and the public’s attention in Canada. The troubling case of Jian Ghomeshi—and the subsequent investigation at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC)—brought this issue squarely into the workplace realm.

Protests Move North of the Border? Canadian Employers’ Responses to a National General Strike

On February 17, 2017, activists opposing the new administration are planning a national general strike, including protests and work stoppages. In light of the growing support for the strike, U.S employers face questions concerning workers who skip work, given the National Labor Relations Act’s (NLRA) protections. For example, Section 7 of the NLRA gives employees the right to engage in concerted activities for the purpose of their “mutual aid or protection,” while Section 8 makes it unlawful for an employer to interfere with, restrain, or coerce employees in the exercise of their Section 7 rights.